DIY Boston Tea Stain Bunting

Hello Darlings!

As July marches forward, and I start itching for autumn, I have to remind myself to linger in summer just a while longer. July in particular puts me in a patriotic mood. To be  quite honest, I’m always in a patriotic mood, but July seems like a good time to share a little star spangled DIY with you.

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Not to sound contrary, but I’ve always had an affinity for the British style of patriotic decor. It seems for almost every national occasion, and even private ones, our cousins across the pond hang adorable Union Jack buntings. There is something wonderfully nostalgic in that! Being the red-blooded all American girl that I am, I wanted to create that same nostalgia when rooting for my home team. The problem was where to begin? The good old US of A is very much a modern nation with eyes drawn forward. And while that is wonderful for innovation, it hardly serves the quaint and homespun feel I longed for. So, as with most things in life, I look to the past, colonial New England to be exact. Here’s my little How To for your own Boston Teas Stain Patriotic Bunting.

Boston-Tea-Stain- Bunting- DIY- Dolly Marlowe

Supplies

Bunting (I purchased mine at Home Depot)

Black tea (I went with the giant box of the cheap stuff as I wasn’t drinking it)

Coffee grounds (optional, but gives a wonderful spotting effect)

A large pot

Tongs

Large baking sheet

Instructions

 

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Step 1: Gather up your bags of tea. I used 6 to 8 bags per bunting.

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Step 2: Fill a large pot 3/4 of the way full with water. Add teabags and bring to a boil. Add the bunting to the tea. Allow to boil for 2 to 3 minutes, then let it sit in the solution for a few hours. I let mine sit overnight.

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STEP 3: Remove the bunting from the tea solution with tongs and place it on a baking sheet. CAUTION! The bunting will be hot! If you want a more rustic look, spread used coffee grounds on the bunting and let it dry. Rinse the coffee grounds off the bunting in cold water. CAUTION! Coffee grounds are toxic  to pets, so keep the critters away from your workspace.

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Step 4: Lay out your bunting to dry on an old towel or something you don’t mind inadvertently staining. While it is still a little damp, iron out the wrinkles whilst pressing in the pleats.

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Step 6: Hang and enjoy. I keep my buntings up most of the year, only taking them down for autumn and winter decorating.

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A few helpful hints: To get a really rustic and aged look, add a dry bunting to the boiling tea solution, and allow some bits to peek out of the liquid. For an more uniform look, wet the bunting first, then keep it fully submerged in the tea. You can put a rock or brick on it if it tends to float up. If you’d like to wash your bunting before hanging it, do so on a cold gentle cycle, and lay flat to dry. You can also repeat the staining process until you get the look you want.

I’d love to see what you create! Comment with a photo or share with me via electronic telegraph (I think the kids are calling it Twitter, or some such nonsense).

XOXO

Dolly Marlowe

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